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benedict xvi stunned every this week by announcing he is resigning at the end of this month. we expect the cardinals to gather in mid-to late march to elect a new pope. our brian todd has a closer look now at who will run things in the meantime, and at the politics of picking the pope's successor. >> reporter: it is politics in overdrive, with the pope leaving february 28th, who will be in power at the vatican until a new pope is elected. there is a position, a right-hand man to the pope, who deals with finances and the managing tasks. it was portrayed as a master power broker. in real life, the title was held by the cardinal who also holds the powerful position of secretary of state, who in the vatican is like a prime minister. but experts say don't get the idea that bertoni is the stuff of movie legend. >> despite the job title and movies, he is not the best organizer? >> no, the joke in rome is he couldn't organize a one-man band, the number one criticism is they couldn't make the job run on time. >> reporter: the correspondent for the national catholic reporter newspaper says that
benedict xvi no longer is the leader of the 1.2 billion roman catholics. his resignation the first of any pope in nearly 600 years took effect a couple hours ago. christiane amanpour is joining us. benedict ended his reign a couple of hours ago. what's it like now? what's the mood there? >> reporter: well, listen, i think people are taking it in stock and moving forward but i must say a couple of hours ago when 2:00 p.m. eastern, 8:00 p.m. local, the swiss guard, the traditional guard that protects the pope walked inside, closed the doors when he was at castel go gandolfo and you got that sense of finality t, it's been very dramatic when he flew in his helicopter, landed there, came out on the balcony of the summer residence and told people, i am no longer pope today. i am just a pilgrim. all of a sudden the emotion and enormity of what happened, because it's a precedent-setting event, all of that set in and you saw the pope look almost -- i don't know. almost relieved when he gave his last blessing. having looked very tired in morning in his meeting with the cardinals and yesterday durin
of this ends for pope benedict xvi. >> reporter: wolf, you're right. it was emotional for his devotees as he made his final appearance. st. peter's square behind me was packed and the pope came out in his popemobile and there were a lot of waves and st. peter's is behind me and the vatican is where this pope is spending his last night on the throne as pope. tomorrow he will say good-bye to cardinals and then at 5:00 p.m. local time here in rome he leaves the vatican and goes to castel gandolfo. people want there to be some distance between him and the conclave to elect the next pope. the empty seats set in and this interim period before a new pope is chosen. >> there will be an interim pope, acting pope? walk us through that between that and the time that a new pope is elected. >> not really. not formally in that name. there's secretary of state, heads of all of these very different bureaucracies here at the vatican. but is iiss as we know this is leader of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. as we know, the pope is more than just a religious leader. he's virtually a states man by virtue of t
with the holy father. the pope benedict xvi would tell the cardinals and bishops, talk, open up, let it all be known. >> reporter: he agrees with victims here in milwaukee that the archdiocese has taken an especially hard line to keep abuse secrets hidden and to protect its money. representing hundreds of clergy abuse victims from around the country. >> the archdiocese of milwaukee has been particularly deceitful because they've been insulated for so long. they felt and believed they could get away with it. >> reporter: for decades, wisconsin's state law prevented most victims of sexual abuse from filing lawsuits which protected the church. when that changed, critics say the archdiocese prepared for upcoming lawsuits by moving its money. church financial records show $55 million buried here, in a cemetery trust fund. the church says the money was paid by people who bought burial plots at eight archdiocese cemeteries. a law professor says that if any money was moved to protect the abuse victims, the diocese may have broken the law. >> you can't, in anticipation of insolvency, transfer assets
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